International Day for the Preservation of Ozone Layer

Event date: 
2020-09-15 23:15 to 2020-09-16 22:30

introduction -the beginning         benefits of funded research    
Introduction
 
Objectives
 
Theme and message
 
South Africa's celebration
 
Media speeches and statements
 

 

Introduction and background

 

A number of commonly used chemicals have been found to be extremely damaging to the ozone layer. Halocarbons are chemicals in which one or more carbon atoms are linked to one or more halogen atoms (fluorine, chlorine, bromine or iodine). Halocarbons containing bromine usually have much higher ozone-depleting potential (ODP) than those containing chlorine. The man-made chemicals that have provided most of the chlorine and bromine for ozone depletion are methyl bromide, methyl chloroform, carbon tetrachloride and families of chemicals known as halons, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs).

This scientific confirmation of the depletion of the ozone layer prompted the international community to establish a mechanism for cooperation to take action to protect the ozone layer. This was formalized in the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer, which was adopted and signed by 28 countries, on 22 March 1985. In September 1987, this led to the drafting of The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

 

Aims and objectives of the Motreal Protocol

 

The principal aim of the Montreal Protocol is to protect the ozone layer by taking measures to control total global production and consumption of substances that deplete it, with the ultimate objective of their elimination on the basis of developments in scientific knowledge and technological information. It is structured around several groups of ozone-depleting substances. The groups of chemicals are classified according to the chemical family and are listed in annexes to the Montreal Protocol text. The protocol requires the control of nearly 100 chemicals, in several categories. For each group or annex of chemicals, the treaty sets out a timetable for the phase-out of production and consumption of those substances, with the aim of eventually eliminating them completely.

With the DEFF being a leader in environmental issues of the Repubic of South Africa, the Branch Climate Change and Air Quality is responsible for climate change related issues, while the Branch Chemicals and Waste Mannagement takes the leading in chemicals related matters and ozone depleting substances. The ozone issue, while it has great emphasis on chemically processed products as ozone depleting subsance, the effects, are also climate related. In this regard

 

Theme and messages

 

This year, we celebrate 35 years of the Vienna Convention and 35 years of global ozone layer protection. Life on earth would not be possible without sunlight. But the energy emanating from the sun would be too much for life on Earth to thrive were it not for the ozone layer. This stratospheric layer shields earth from most of the sun’s harmful ultraviolet radiation. Sunlight makes life possible, but the ozone layer makes life as we know it possible.

 

South Africa's celebration

 

With the DEFF being a leader in environmental issues of the Repubic of South Africa, the Branch Climate Change and Air Quality is responsible for climate change related issues, while the Branch Chemicals and Waste Mannagement takes the leading in chemicals related matters and ozone depleting substances. The effects of the ozone issue are climate related, whilst on the other hand it has great emphasis on chemically processed products as ozone depleting subsance. In this regard, world Ozone celebration in South Africa is intertwined with National Recycling Week due to its emphasis on the effects of the harmful chemically processed material towards the ozone layer. During this week's celebration:

 

Minister Creecy hosts Circular Economy Dialogue Webinar

 

Date:      Monday, 14 September 2020
Time:      09:00 – 13:00

The department organised the dialogue in order to provide all stakeholders from government, civil society organisations, businesses, academia and other stakeholders an opportunity to deliberate on circular economy implementation in South Africa and in Africa.

The webinar will bring together government and the private sector to deliberate on South Africa’s approach to sustainable, inclusive economic growth and development in the waste sector while reducing the social and environmental impacts of waste.

The dialogue is arranged as part of the SA Recycling Week activities aimed at raising awareness to consumers and businesses on environment and climate impact of waste, promoting clean and sustainable waste management practices that minimize environmental impacts by adopting and transitioning to new innovative means that assist in reduction, reuse, repurpose, recycle or upcycle of waste material

With the theme “Advancing Circularity and Sustainable Consumption”, the dialogue is intended to provide stakeholders an opportunity for a discussion on diversion of waste from going to the landfill sites, through innovative means such as reduction, reuse, repurpose, recycle or upcycle of their waste materials.

 

Media speeches and statements

 

Statement by Minister Creecy during Circular Economy Webinar in celebration of SA Recycling Week

Thank you very much for inviting me today to open this circular economy dialogue. We meet during a very challenging and difficult time when the country is currently grappling with the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic. We all have been affected; as a result of the pandemic there has been minimal economic activity, jobs have been lost, industries and businesses have downsized or completely closed shop. Across the world governments are working on economic recovery strategies.

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