South Africa and Botswana - Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) Project

Regional Environment and Social Assessment (RESA) Of Coal Based Energy Projects along South Africa and Botswana Borders

1 Introduction

The RESA is a SADC project of coal based energy along the SA and Botswana Borders. The RES MoU was signed by both Ministers of Water and Environmental Affairs of SA and Botswana respectively on 30 August 2012 and is now ready for implementation.

The RESA Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) outlines broad project areas of co-operation between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Republic of Botswana.  It focuses thus: Through the RESA study, the Participants will focus on those impacts that are significant or have the potential of becoming significant and would or should have an influence on decision making in the “area of influence” of existing and proposed coal-based investments and projects in the South Africa - Botswana border area.

2 Terms of Reference (ToR) for the RESA Study

Background

The sub-region (including South Africa, Botswana, and its neighbouring countries) has been experiencing severe shortages of power since the end of 2007, due to high growth and lagging investments in new capacity. Botswana’s energy demand is supplied partially by the energy generated from its Morupule A Power Station and mostly by the imported energy from South Africa (through Eskom). South Africa has been load shedding intermittently since December 2007. The Southern Africa Power Pool (SAPP) generation expansion plan, which includes twelve countries of the region, indicates a need to add nearly 39,000 MW through 2025, of which about 32,000 MW is intended to meet South Africa’s demand alone.

The Government of Botswana desires that energy sector development – especially coal-fired power plant generation – be developed with the least environmental and social impacts possible.  The Government of Botswana and the Botswana Power Corporation (BPC) have called on the World Bank to partner in the country’s energy sector development and requested an IBRD loan for the Morupule B Project investments (Morupule B power station, transmission lines, and substations) and Technical Assistance (TA).  The TA component includes support for a Regional Environmental and Social Assessment (RESA) to examine the cumulative environment and socio-economic impacts of all the planned and existing energy sector investments on both sides of the border between Botswana and South Africa.

The RESA, which will be jointly conducted by Botswana and South Africa will be used to aid planning and decision-making in the region, to identify specific interventions that may be required, and to provide a common view for both Botswana and South Africa on the nature and magnitude of potential cross border impacts. The RESA will need to build on and expand the preliminary assessment that has been offered here. That process will be one of updating the information presented in the assessment, properly characterising and assessing the impacts that have been qualitatively presented and affirming or modifying the assessment findings. The focus of the RESA is likely cumulative and cross-border impacts that may derive from existing and proposed energy projects in the Botswana-South African border area.  These energy projects are listed below and supplemented by a map which indicates the location of the projects:

3 South Africa

3.1 Matimba power station 

The Matimba Power Station is an existing power station with an output of some 3990MW. The power station is situated approximately 13km west of Lephalale. Coal is sourced from the Grootegeluk Coal Mine, just to the west of the power station.

3.2 Medupi power station

The Medupi Power Station (4800 MW) (previously known as Matimba B Power Station) is currently under construction. This project will require (with the associated plant [terrace area]) an area of approximately 700 ha, and an additional 500 - 1000 ha for ancillary services, including ashing facilities. It is anticipated that 7 million tonnes of coal per year will be required in order to supply the power station. The proposed positioning of the power station is approximately 20 km west of Lephalale.

3.3 Coal 3 and Coal 4

These two proposed 5400 MW power stations will require an area of at least 5000 ha (including ancillary services), although sites of up to 8000 ha have been considered as part of the project. The proposed sites are as close as 10km to the Botswana border, and approximately 40km west of Lephalale.

3.4 Mafutha

Project Mafutha is a proposed new 80 000 bpd Coal to Liquid Plant, as well as a new mine of approximately 40 million tpa run of mine capacity (adjacent to the site of the CtL facility) and town for an estimated 60 000 inhabitants, and a services corridor linking the various project units.  Mafutha will be located about 30km west of the existing Matimba power station, and just north of the proposed sites for Coal 3 and Coal 4.

4 Botswana

4.1 Morupule A power station

The existing Morupule A power station (132 MW) consists of four turbo-generators, each with a rating of 33 MW output. The power station utilizes between 480 000 - 600 000 tons of coal per annum, depending on the availability of the plant. The power station is located about 300 km north of Gaborone. The coal is transported by a 2km conveyor belt from a nearby underground mine.

4.2 Morupule B power station

The Morupule B Power Station is to be situated adjacent to the existing Morupule Power A Station. Palapye is the nearest village, situated approximately 5 km to the east of the power station site. The power station is planned for 2 phases, with phase 1 involving 4 x 150 MW units (600MW), and phase 2 planning on doubling this capacity to a total of 1200 MW. The area required for the plant is approximately 476ha. Indicative coal requirements are between 2.2 and 2.7 million tonnes per annum.

4.3 Mmamabula energy project

This proposed 2700 MW power plant is about 80 km west of Matimba Power Plant in South Africa.  The proposed area that has been assessed for this project (including ancillary services) is approximately 3000ha. Coal will potentially be mined from the Mookane and Dovedale sites (with the current focus on Mookane Site). It is likely that a new residential village will be required for this project, and currently it is proposed to establish this near to Mmaphashalala. Indicative coal requirements are between 2.2 and 2.7 million tonnes per annum.

4.4 Mmamantswe

The actual size of the Mmamantswe Power Station is yet to be finalised, but current scenarios are for 2 x 500MW units, with a capacity to expand to another two units at a later stage (for a total of 2000MW). The proposed site is approximately 80km north of Gaborone and about 15km from the South African border near Olifants Drift.  Current scenarios suggest that coal will be mined (using an open cut method) from the adjacent Mmamantswe coal deposit, containing approximately 1.3 billion tonnes of black coal. It is predicted that the coal consumption for the Mmamantswe Energy Project (for the 2 x 500 MW) units will be around 4 million tons per annum.

5 Objectives of the study

The objective of the study is to assess the regional environmental and social impacts of the existing and proposed coal-based energy projects along the Botswana-South Africa border.  The assessment is to determine the cumulative environmental and social impacts of these projects over the next twenty (20) years and to propose policy recommendations and, identify specific mitigation measures for curtailing the negative impacts and enhancing the benefits.

5.1 General Approach

The RESA must focus on those impacts that would (or should) have an influence on decision making in the “area of influence” of coal-based (existing) investments and (proposed) projects in the Botswana-South Africa border area.  By definition, cross-border impacts will be considered important for decision-making and thus will be considered as strategic impacts.  At the same time, large-scale cumulative impacts will be seen as potentially significant and these too will be viewed as strategic impacts.  On that basis, the following are considered to be strategic impacts for the RESA:

a. Air quality impacts on human health and/or biodiversity;

b. Surface water resource impacts;

c. Groundwater resource impacts with special attention to acid mine drainage impacts(there should be a strong link between the groundwater and surface water studies);

d. Social Impacts;

e. Economic Impacts;

f. Climate Change Impacts

g. Biodiversity Impacts; and,

h. Cultural/Archaeological/Heritage Impacts

5.2 Scope of Work

The Scope of Work consists of the following eleven (11) tasks as detailed under Sections 5.3.1 to 5.3.6: 

Task 1:  Review of existing strategic planning, land use planning, and natural resource management planning documents including but not necessarily limited to the Waterberg EMF, the Waterberg Priority Area and the WRC’s investigations into AMD potential in the shallow Waterberg coal reserves and any other relevant documents in the proposed study area;

Task 2: Air Quality Impacts on Human Health and/or Biodiversity;

Task 3: Surface Water Resource Impacts;

Task 4: Groundwater Resource Impacts;

Task 5: Social Impacts;

Task 6: Economic Impacts;

Task 7: Climate Change Impacts;

Task 8: Biodiversity impacts;

Task 9: Cultural/ Archaeological/Heritage Impacts;

Task 10: Formulation of strategies for mitigation (reduction) of adverse impacts and enhancing the benefits; and

Task 11: Stakeholder Consultation.

5.2.1 Existing information

Wherever possible the Consultant must make use of existing (reliable) information rather than gathering new data.  The principle is to make the study as cost-effective as possible minimising resource expenditure on gathering data.    

5.2.2 Area of influence

For each of the impact categories, the Consultant will identify and characterize the ‘area of influence’ for each of the individual coal-based energy projects.  Within the combined areas of influence the Consultant will then assess the potential cumulative impacts of the coal-based industries located in the Botswana-South Africa border area.

5.2.3 State of the receiving environment

Within each impact domain the Consultant will, maximising the use of existing information characterise the state of the receiving environment by:

a. Specifying the size of the area (impact domain) that needs to be assessed as a function of the anticipated area where an impact may manifest?

b. Listing all the variables that are needed to characterise the baseline e.g. ambient air quality (SO2, PM, NOx, CO), water quality (biological, chemical, physical), population, hospitals, housing and so forth).

c. Defining an existing state (or baseline) for each of these variables quantitatively wherever this is possible and qualitatively where it is not;

d. Defining a maximum acceptable level of impact for each of the variables identified (i.e. standards, limits, thresholds); and,

e. Highlighting information that is not available, and defining the importance of that missing information in respect of representativeness and what has been done (viz. assumptions made or proxies used) to address that missing information.

f. Data should be collected and deposited in a geographical information system accessible in both countries i.e. www.environment.gov.za and www.eis.gov.bw

5.2.4 Assessment

Within each impact domain the Consultant will, maximising the use of existing information, assess the potential cumulative impacts of the various energy projects by:

a. Identifying and quantifying the environmental and/or social aspects of the various energy projects (note that the aspects listed in this preliminary assessment need to be verified and updated where required);

b. Assessing the degree to which the previously identified aspects will affect the existing state of the environment from one or more of the individual energy projects;

c. Wherever possible linking the aspects to the individual variables defined in terms of the baseline e.g. emissions of SO2 will increase the ambient concentrations of SO2 resulting in an increased risk of upper respiratory tract disease; and,

d. Characterise the significance of the impacts.

5.2.5 Management Measures

The JTC will propose institutional arrangements and the Consultant will propose management interventions to the JTC, to  implement the  recommendations for mitigating the adverse impacts and enhancing the benefits. 

5.2.6 Description of Tasks

Task 1: Air quality impacts on human health and/or biodiversity

The Consultant will, maximising the use of existing and available information:

a. Describe each energy project in the Botswana-South Africa border area, emphasizing the factors affecting air emissions. The description can include the plant capacity and design (in terms of boiler type, air pollution control system/equipment (sulphur removal during combustion, or post-combustion with ESP or baghouse filter), and stack characteristics; coal type (washed/run-of mine), characteristics, and feed rate; and pollutant emissions in the flue gases;

b. Specify the boundaries of the area of influence (the study boundary) for atmospheric emission impacts on a map.

c. Within the area of influence, describe the surface cover/land use patterns; list and describe locations of flora and fauna of concern; and list and characterize the main population centres and other human settlements and population density together with cultural heritage resources;

d. Characterise the climate and the dispersion meteorology (in particular, those parameters that are used for input in dispersion modelling) including the meso-scale circulation patterns that drive air flow in the vicinity of the Botswana-South African border, with emphasis on the possible long-range pollutant transport in the direction of Gaborone and PWV Megalopolis

e. Describe and assess the legal/regulatory framework regarding air pollution management policies, laws and regulations in Botswana and South Africa.

f. Describe and assess the institutional framework regarding air pollution management policies, laws and regulations in Botswana and South Africa.

g. List all the pollutant parameters that need to be characterized (e.g. for ambient air quality impacts: SO2, PM-10, NOx, ozone, and selected based on PM analysis for heavy metals).

h. Within the area of influence, compile ambient quality parameters for selected pollutant parameters

i. Within the area of influence, obtain meteorological data site–specific and representative to air dispersion modelling.

j. Within the area of influence, develop an emissions inventory for such emission sources as industries, mines, residences, biomass burning, motor vehicles, and others. The types of pollutants will include PM, SO2, and NOx (and, if data is available, heavy metals).

k. Identify a suitable air pollution dispersion model to estimate the air quality impacts in the project’s area of influence (including Gaborone and PWV), and calibrate the model using existing ambient air quality data. A long-range transport of atmospheric emissions from the energy projects in the Botswana-South Africa border area would be needed to estimate the potential ambient pollutant concentrations in Gaborone and PWV.

l. Calibrate the model or at least present comparative measurements to assess the accuracy of the model;

m. Run the dispersion model with the existing sources of emissions and compare the data against the monitored ambient air quality data;

n. Update the air dispersion model using appropriate calibration factors;

o. Run the updated dispersion model with the existing and proposed energy projects;

p. Use the WHO ambient air quality guidelines to assess human health impacts and the EU (or UK) standards to assess impacts on crops. In addition, air quality data for heavy metals can be obtained from international standards (e.g. U.S. mercury standards); where national standards are more stringent these should be used;

q. Identify hot spots – all points with predicted concentrations that exceed the WHO or EU (or UK) standards based on receptor type; and

r. Assess options for mitigation measures to ensure compliance with the WHO guidelines and EU (or UK) standards, and recommend the most appropriate compliance measure(s).

Task 2: Surface Water Resource Impacts

The Consultant will, maximising the use of existing and available information:

a. Describe each energy project in the Botswana-South Africa border area, emphasizing the factors affecting surface water quality and water use. The description can include the plant capacity and design (in terms of boiler type, pollution control system/equipment, coal type (washed/run-of mine), and waste water discharges;

b. Specify the boundaries of the area of influence (the study boundary) for surface water quality impacts on a map.

c. Within the area of influence, describe the surface cover/land use patterns; list and describe locations of flora and fauna of concern; list and characterize main population centres and habitation patterns (especially subsistence farmers);

d. Describe and assess the legal/regulatory framework regarding surface water pollution management policies, laws and regulations in Botswana and South Africa assessing in particular any inter-governmental agreements between the two countries as these may pertain to water resource protection;

e. List all the water quality parameters that need to be characterized; f. Within the area of influence, compile existing surface water quality parameters for selected water quality parameters;

g. Within the area of influence, develop an inventory of other sources within the catchment or along water sources that impact on surface water within the region.

h. Using a scientifically defendable method characterise the likely resultant water quality that may result as a result of the combined operations of the various energy projects; i. Characterise the likely resultant water quality water for existing and proposed energy projects;

j. Identify hot spots – all points with higher concentrations above the defined standards.

k. Assess options for mitigation measures to ensure compliance with the defined standards, and recommend the most appropriate compliance measure(s). Propose policy(ies) and institutional arrangements to ensure implementation of the recommended measure(s) for mitigating the adverse impacts;

l.. Characterize and define the ecological reserve requirements of the Olifants Water Management Area (WMA), with a particular focus on the Limpopo River;

m. Determine if the ecological reserve will be provided for, and how it will be provided for, as a function of the proposed water augmentation project, as well as all water allocation processes from sources within the WMA;

n. Characterise the groundwater dependence of communities living in the Botswana - South Africa border area;

o. Determine the sustainability of the supply from either the surface water resource on the South African side, or the ground water resource from the South African and Botswana side and assess within the context of the water use requirements of energy project within the South African-Botswana border area;

p. Determine how livelihoods may be affected as a result of water resource or contamination of the resource by the energy-projects;

q. Assess the likely quality of the water that will be supplied from MCWAP (Mokolo Crocodile-West Augmentation Project) and on the basis of this assessment characterize the treatment requirements, and volume and quantity, of waste water that will need to be discharged, as well as quantity and quality (i.e. hazardous or non-hazardous) brines and sludges that will need to be treated and disposed of; and,

r. Asses the implications of waste water discharges on the existing ground and surface water in the area and describe how this may impact on water availability and use.

Task 3: Groundwater Quality Impacts

The Consultant will, maximising the use of existing and available information:

a. Describe each energy project in the Botswana-South Africa border area, emphasizing the factors affecting ground water quality. This would include using groundwater as a resource as well as activities that may generate leachate or other forms of potential groundwater impact with special attention to acid mine drainage impacts;

b. Specify the boundaries of the area of influence (the study boundary) for ground water quality impacts on a map;

c. Describe and assess the legal/regulatory framework regarding ground water pollution management policies, laws and regulations in Botswana and South Africa;

d. Describe and assess the institutional framework regarding ground water pollution management policies, laws and regulations in Botswana and South Africa; e. List all the pollutant parameters that need to be characterized;

f. Within the area of influence, compile existing ground water quality parameters for selected pollutant parameters;

g. Within the area of influence, develop an inventory of other sources within the catchment or along water sources that impact on ground water within the region;

h. Characterize the ground water resource in the South African-Botswana border area, focusing particularly on linkages between aquifers in the two countries and including the Limpopo River;

i. Ascertain the sustainable yield from these ground water resources;

j. Determine the sustainability of the supply from either the surface water resource on the South African side, or the ground water resource from the South African and Botswana side and assess within the context of the water use requirements of energy project within the South African-Botswana border area;

k. Assess the likely quality of the water that will be supplied from MCWAP and on the basis of this assessment characterize the treatment requirements, and volume and quantity, of waste water that will need to be disposed of and how this may affect the groundwater resource;

l. Using a scientifically defendable method characterise the likely resultant ground water quality that may result as a result of the combined operations of the various energy projects; and,

m. Characterise the likely resultant ground water quality water for existing and proposed energy projects;

Task 4: Social Impacts

The proposed energy projects (investments) would lead to population growth, with additional needs for health care, and general services including education and skills development and, possibly, associated investments. The Consultant will, maximising the use of existing and available information:

a. Describe each energy project in the Botswana-South Africa border area, emphasizing the factors affecting the social environment;

b. Specify the boundaries of the area of influence (the study boundary) on a map.

c. Within the area of influence, describe social environment focussing in particular on the populations that may be affected including education and skills status (employability), vulnerabilities such as health risks, and livelihoods;

d. Describe and assess the legal/regulatory framework regarding social impact management policies, laws and regulations in Botswana and South Africa;

e. Characterize in detail the skills and capabilities of people living in the area, focusing particularly on their livelihoods and how these livelihoods are maintained;

f. Characterize the labour requirements in the energy based industry in the South African-Botswana border area, detailing in particular the phasing and requirements for construction labour, operations labour, and labour in support of shut-downs and maintenance;

g. Determine the degree to which local labour can be used for addressing these labour requirements;

h. Define the training and skills development programs that could plausibly be implemented to maximize local labour uptake to these various labour requirements;

i. Ascertain on the basis of project phasing the likely demobilisation periods where construction or other part time labour will be demobilized;

j. Determine the impact of society on these labour demobilisation processes;

k. Ascertain and detail mechanisms that can be used to reduce the impacts of these demobilisation episodes; and,

l. Characterize the likely inflows of job seekers in terms of likely origin and skills base.

Task 5: Economic Impacts

The Consultant will, maximising the use of existing and available information:

a. Describe each investment in the Botswana-South Africa border area, emphasizing the factors affecting the economic environment;

b. Describe and assess the legal/regulatory framework regarding economic impact management policies, laws and regulations in Botswana and South Africa;

c. Describe and assess the institutional framework regarding economic impact management policies, laws and regulations in Botswana and South Africa;

d. Determine the total capital costs of the various energy projects in the South African-Botswana border area;

e. Characterize the monetary flow in terms of these capital costs in terms of money that will go offshore and money that will be spent nationally and locally;

f. Develop an economic model that determines who will receive money as a result of spending through the provision of services or wages;

g. Derive a suitable ‘multiplier’ for the area and supplement the previous analysis with the multiplier and associated knock-on benefits; and,

h. Predict the growth in GDP in Botswana and GDP for South Africa and also the possible growth scenarios at a local level in both countries.

i. Liaise with parties executing or evaluation projects in the area to determine if past studies on the economic impact of the projects has been conducted (relevant in terms of projects that may have a macro-economic impact on the country and not just on the immediate area in which the project occurs)

Task 6: Climate Change Impacts

The Consultant will, maximising the use of existing and available information, most especially the planned reductions in Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions in each country:

a. Accurately quantify all (GHG) emissions from the various energy projects in the South African-Botswana border area;

b. Determine how the total load compares to country volumes in aggregate terms and total volumes for the South African-Botswana border area;

c. Assess the latest developments in terms of the IPCC and characterize the likely limitations in terms of GHG emissions that may manifest over the next twenty years; and.

d. Assess the implications of these requirements on activities within the South African-Botswana border area and for both Botswana and South Africa individually.

e. Consider the efficiency of coal usage, possibly by assessing the tons of coal used per product produced (the product is a unit of energy kWh); and

f. Recommend mitigation measures which will augment interventions/options the countries are considering in reaching emission step down targets.

Task 7: Biodiversity Impacts

The Consultant will, maximising the use of existing and available information:

a. Specify the boundaries of the area of influence (study boundary) on a map;

b. Describe the existing biological diversity in the study boundary through faunal and floristic survey, wetland survey, etc;

c. Describe the attributes to be considered in determining the ecologically sensitive areas within the study boundary (e.g. habitat uniqueness and quality (local and regional), gazetted wildlife management / conservation areas, heritage sites and archaeologically sensitive areas, presence of Red Data species, medicinally and culturally significant species etc);

d. Specify the areas of ecological sensitivity on a map and provide for comparison, overlays indicating the biodiversity impacts;

e. Describe and assess the effects of the combined operations of the projects on the biodiversity gene pool in the study boundary and the potential reduction, loss or variance of biodiversity resulting from the alteration of the ecosystems within the area of influence;

f. Assess the value of biodiversity in the area of influence in relation to the goods and services provided by the ecosystems and determine how livelihoods may be affected as a result of biodiversity reduction, loss or variance;

g. Determine the effects on soil fertility, breeding populations of fish and game or wild animals, natural regeneration of woodland, wetland resource degradation or wise use of wetlands with an aim of ensuring sustainable use of biodiversity by the local communities;

h. Assess options for mitigation measures to ensure conservation of biodiversity, and recommend the most appropriate compliance measure(s). Propose policy(ies) and institutional arrangements to ensure implementation of the recommended measure(s) for mitigating the adverse impacts;

i. Describe and assess the legal / regulatory framework regarding the ecological /environmental management policies, laws and regulations in Botswana and South Africa as well as regional and bilateral agreements between the two countries as these may pertain to environmental protection and conservation; and,

j. Develop a programme to monitor changes in biodiversity within the area of influence over time.

Task 8: Impacts on the Cultural, Archaeological and Heritage resources

The Consultant will, maximising the use of existing and available information:

a. Undertake a survey to establish the heritage status of the area of influence (study area)

b. Carry out a mapping exercise of all heritage resources within the study area

c. Develop coordinates of all heritage resources to guide future developments

d. Report on the existence and importance of heritage resources to livelihoods and the developments of tourism

e. Recommend measures for the maintenance of the integrity and authenticity of the area for possible listing as a world heritage site

f. Describe and assess the legal/regulatory framework regarding the conservation and / or management of heritage resources, laws and regulations in Botswana and South Africa.

Task 9: Formulation of management measures for mitigation of adverse impacts

The Consultant will, maximising the use of existing and available information:

a. List and describe various interventions that could be used to reduce or mitigate the cumulative impacts associated with the various energy projects;

b. Describe mechanisms for the implementation of these interventions such as individual company responsibility, national policy, regulations and so forth.

c. Highlight key areas of uncertainty that will require special monitoring as the various projects unfold to ensure that impacts have been properly understood and characterised/assessed;

d. Define a combined monitoring regime for the area that will serve to provide an ongoing measure of general environmental quality in the area;

e. Define suitable performance measures and targets that can be used to assess ongoing performance assessments;

f. Consider options for integration and /cooperation with settlements in Botswana; and,

g. Consider the impact of opportunities related to coal bed methane (CBM) from Botswana on the longevity of assets for power generation and liquid fuel production.

Task 10: Stakeholder consultations

It is important that the regional assessment of the environmental and social development impacts of energy projects in the Botswana-South Africa border area be conducted in consultation with key stakeholders (e.g. relevant government agencies, business community, civil society organizations, donor agencies) in both countries. Such consultations will be aimed at providing study-related information (e.g. ToR, findings on impact assessments, policy recommendations) to the stakeholders and also receiving stakeholders’ views for incorporation into the design of this study. This process should also allow early engagement of the stakeholders into the planning process for mitigating the potential adverse impacts of these energy projects. The areas of potential impacts are envisaged to be: (i) air quality impacts; (ii) surface water resource impacts; (iii) groundwater resource impacts; (iv) economic impacts; (v) social impacts; and (vi) climate change impacts (vii) biodiversity impacts (viii) impacts on cultural and heritage resources. Stakeholder consultations will be conducted on a continuum basis during the course implementation of these consulting services.

The consultant will:

a. Prepare a consultation plan inclusive of a communication strategy identifying the key stakeholders in each impact area on both sides of the border, and describing how and when the consultations will be conducted. The key stakeholders will include, but not limited to, Ministry of Minerals, Energy and Water Resources (MMEWR), BPC, DEA and Department of Waste Management and Pollution Control (DWMPC) in Botswana and Sasol, Eskom, Department of Environmental Affairs, Department of Energy, Department of Mineral Resources, Department of Water Affairs and Department of Health in South Africa. The consultation plan will require recording of, among other things, who was consulted and what were the issues raised during the consultation meetings, and how the study intended to address the issues/concerns raised; and,

b. Implement the consultations according to the consultation plan.

6 Ownership of the final product

The RESA will be the property of the SA and Botswana governments and all information gathered by the consultants during the course of the study is to be made available to the respective authorities on completion of the RESA.

6.1 Capacity building and transfer of skills

The consultant will ensure that every opportunity is examined for capacity building and skills transfer.  Mechanisms that will be used to achieve this important requirement are to be detailed in the proposal.

6.2 Work Coordination

This section needs to be re-phrased to reflect the institutional set- up document.

6.3 Deliverable and Schedule

The Consultant will develop a programme for the execution of the RESA including a detailed schedule, work breakdown structure and milestones and deliverables. An overall schedule of 12 months is envisaged, but the consultant can motivate for additional time if that is considered necessary.  The table below serves to provide a framework within which the detailed schedule is to be developed and also lists the deliverables that are to be provided.

Item Number of Copies* Due Date (months from start)
(A) Inception report, to then be the basis of public consultation as a draft scoping report after presentation to and discussion with the Joint Technical Committee. Inception report should provide a review of existing documents and information, the approach/methodology to be used, the consultation plan, work plan with clearly defined milestones. 7 1
(B) Prepare a consultation plan and present to the Joint Technical Committee to review. 7 1
(C) First round of consultation - all issues to be captured and documented in issues-response report 7 2
(D) Revisit ToRs to ensure that relevant public issues have been suitably addressed. Note the principle here is to only address those comments that are germane to the RESA objectives. Consultation must manage expectations and ensure that the RESA does not attempt to become everything to everybody.   2
(E) Conduct specialist assessments in response to ToRs. 7 5
(F) Submit each specialist assessment report to the Joint Technical Committee for internal review.   6
(G) Update specialist assessments in response to comments from the Joint Technical Committee   7
(H) Write up integrated RESA report, drawing from each of the specialist assessment as appropriate   8
(I) Draft RESA for presentation to and discussion with the Joint Technical Committee   9
(J) Update RESA and write up non-technical summary 7 9
(K) Public disclosure and consultations on the Draft RESA   10
(L) Review of public comments with Joint Technical Committee - agree on modifications that need to be made to the final report   11
(M) Final RESA 7 12

*This number to be finalised once the number of institutions constituting the Joint Technical Committee and where relevant the Joint Advisory Committee.

Consultants are expected to provide the following outputs, as per the schedule suggested. Consultants are expected to allocate resources, such as for surveys, keeping this output schedule in mind.  The Inception Report and Draft RESA should be submitted as Word documents for review and comments.  An electronic version (pdf format) on a CD is required for the submission of each deliverable.

6.4 Reporting

The Consultant shall submit deliverables to at least the Joint Technical Committee but may be expanded once the coordination structure has been finalised.)

6.5 Requirements for the Consultant

The project team should include an Air Pollution Specialist, a Hydrologist, a Hydro-geologist, a Social Scientist, an Economist, an Ecologist, an Archaeologist / Heritage Specialist (Botswana requires a locally accredited archaeologist), a Communication Specialist, a Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Specialist  each with a professional experience of a minimum of 10 years in similar projects involving energy.

The team should be headed up by a Project Manager with a minimum of 20 years of professional experience, 10 years of which in multi-disciplinary team (of similar composition) management and 10 additional years in at least one of the specialty areas relevant to this assignment.  Excellent written and verbal communication skills in English are required.


1 PWV: Pretoria-Witwatersrand-Vereeniging industrial and commercial heartland of South Africa